Submitted by Jeff (jhunt@gotnet.net)

" . . . stories from 1890 of the murder and court case of my GGG Grandfather James Jefferson Hunt. This happened near Lena, at the "White and Hatton's" sawmill."

1

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 13, 1999, of a copy of an article taken from the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk dated May 3, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library, Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance lies in connection to killing of J. J. Hunt.

A CHARIVARI ENDS IN A HOMICIDE

On Sunday last, just before midnight, Mr. F. T. Marler, constable of Hineston ward, arrived in Alexandria and took to the parish prison, two white men, Thos. Gentry, aged 25 years, and Claude Stewart, aged 24 years, charged with murder.

The facts in the case are as follows: On or about April 10th Claude Stewart married the widow Warren, and the couple lived on Hemp Hill creek, 25 miles west of Alexandria, and about one-half mile from Hunt's saw mill. On Saturday night, April 26, at about 10 o'clock, a party consisting of about fifteen men and boys went to the house of Mr. and Mrs. Stewart for the purpose of giving them a charivari , and the accused say that some of the party fired buckshot into the house. Besides Mr. Stewart and wife, Thos. Gentry, the brother of Mrs. Stewart, was in the house at the time the charivariing party arrived. Stewart and Gentry, it is said, opened a window and shot into the crowd around the house.

A young white boy, aged 14 years, named Jim Berry Johnson, son of James Johnson, received a buckshot in the forehead and one through the heart, besides two more buckshot and a lot of fine shot in other parts of the body and died instantly. Two white men, F. M. Mitcham, aged 30 years, and Jim Ritchie, aged 35 years, were also slightly wounded by the shots from the house.

Justice Jas. L. Whitehurst, of Hineston ward, held an inquest on Sunday, the 27th, assisted by Dr. Collins, who resides in the neighborhood.

The weapon that is said to have done the damage was an old rifle remodeled into a muzzle-loading shot gun.

Several of the parties who took part in the charivari say that no shots were fired by them; that the shooting done by them were with blank cartridges.

2

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 13, 1999, of Coroners Record No 25766, a record of the inquest into the death of J. J. Hunt, transcribed by a deputy clerk of Rapides Parish, Louisiana, from the handwritten record dated May 22, 1890. Copies of both the transcription and the handwritten record are attached. Original documents are on file in the Rapides Parish Courthouse in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is that J. J. Hunt is a direct ancestor.

No. 25766.

J. J. Hunt.

An inquest taken for the State of Louisiana at White & Hattens Sawmill in the Parish of Rapides the 22 day of May A. D. 1890, before me, T. G. Morgan, Justice Piece acting as Coroner of said Parish of Rapides, State of La., upon view of Body of J. J. Hunt, there lying dead, the jurors whose names are here unto subscribed having been duly sworn to inquire on behalf of State when how and by what means the said J. J. Hunt came to his death upon their oath do say that one James Johnson & John Bolner late of said Parish and State aforesaid on 22 day of May A. D. 1890 between six and seven o'clock A. M. with force and arms at White & Hatten mill in the Parish aforesaid in and upon the body of the aforesaid J. J. Hunt then and there being in the peace of the said State feloniously violently, maliciously and willfully of malice aforethought made and assault & that the aforesaid Jas. Johnson then & there with a certain double barrel shot gun in both hands did shoot and kill J. J. Hunt also Jns. Bolden with a certain Winchester rifle there & there did shoot J. J. Hunt while lying on the ground, to wit 15 buckshot. The said Jas. Johnson shot striking the body of J. J. Hunt on left side just below & behind left shoulder going diagonally through & lodging against skin on chest. The said Jno Bolden one shot from Winchester ball entering just in front of right ear coming out near center & top of head, the said mortal wounds the said J. J. Hunt then & there istantly died & so the said Jas. Johnson & Jno. Bolden then & there feloniously killed & murdered the said J. J. Hunt against the peace & dignity of the State & the said jurors further say upon their oaths aforesaid that Jas. Johnson & Jno. Bolden did wilfully & maliciously shoot at with intent to kill Claud E. Stewart & did commit the felony & murder aforesaid in manner aforesaid against the peace & dignity of the State.

In testimony whereof the said coroner & jurors of this inquest have hereunto subscribed their names the day & year aforesaid.

3

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 12, 1999, of a handwritten inquest record regarding the death of C. E. Stewart and dated May 23, 1890. The original documents (copies are attached) can be found in the Rapides Parish Courthouse in Alexandria, Louisiana. The genealogical significance of this death lies in the connection with the death of James Jefferson Hunt on the same day.

52014

The State of Louisiana

Hineston Ward

Parish of Rapides

Examination of witnesses produced sworn and examined on the 23 day of May 1890 at the residence of C E Stewart, the deceased, before me, James L Whitehurst, justice of the peace, in and for said ward then and there acting as coroner for the time being where(?) an inquest held over the body of C E Stewart.

Ben Stracener being first duly sworn believes(?) and says when he found C E Stewart he was lying on his back dead. About 5 o clock, somewhere about 25 yds from the mill house. Mrs. Stewart ask me to straighten(?) him out and I told her I could not until Igot someone else. Mrs. Stewart says she does not know who killed him. Mrs. Stewart told me that she heard the report of the gun. I heard the two guns firing in quick succession in the direction of the mill.

(Signature)B Stracener

Joseph Rudisell being duly sworn testifies and says "I first came here after a load of lumber. I don't now exactly what time it was in the evening, but it was in the evemng. I first drove across to the lumber yard and I ask for W 0 Rudisell and B Stracener and I could not see them and I went over to C E Stewart to see if he could fix up the load of lumber and he told me he could not and for me to go to B Stracener about one-half mile. C E Stewart got his hat and went with me to the lumber yard and I tied my oxen and left C E Stewart and J R Bolon a talking.

bad. Bolon says how is your little boy? Stewart says he is a little better. Stewart says how is Johnson's little boy? Bolon says he is getting all right. Bolon says looks like you are going to move, and Stewart says know we have been killing bed bugs. Bolon says John Hunt drove off his cattle(?)? Stewart says yes. Bolon says when will he be back or do you know. Stewart says Charley will be back Saturday night.

4

This is the conversation I heard between C E Stewart and J R Bolon. When I first seen Bolon he was coming down the big bill on the east side of the mill. He was armed with a Winchester and a pistol and when me and Mr. Stracener return back to the mill, we found C E Stewart a lying about ten or fifteen steps from where I left him

Joseph Rudisell Jr

3 witness H L McDaniel being duly sworn testify and sas I come to the mill with W G Rudisell and B Stracener and W W Branch and Mrs Stewart got me to go after Doctor Collins for to have to make arrangements to have the body of C E Stewart moved. I don't know who did the killing but I know that he was killed.

H L McDaniel

4 witness W W Branch being duly sworn testifies and says Mr. Branch was notified by his mother that C E Stewart was killed and his assistance was needed. I come to where C E Stewart was killed and know that he was killed. Assisted in moving the deceased body to his Deuling(?) house.

W. W. Branch

I hereby certify that the foregoing is the testimony of all the witnesses taken on an the foregoing inquest and the said was at the time and place first above mentioned and reduced to writing by me.

James L Whitehurst justice of the peace and coroner for the time being

The State of Louisiana, Parish of Rapides.

At an inquest taken this 23 day of May 1890 for the State of Louisiana at Hempbill or Stewarts Mill in the parish aforesaid before me, James T. Whitehurst, justice of the peace in and for the Hineston ward in said parish, acting as coroner of said parish for the time being when view of the body of C. E. Stewart then and there lying dead upon the oaths of C M Whitehurst, George Cook Jr, J E Collins, J T Roughare and T W Deason, good and lawful men of said parish who being duly sworn and charged to inquire on the part of the said state when where how and after what manner the said C E Stewart came to his death do say upon their oath aforesaid that the slain C E Stewart came to his death from the office of Gunshot on the evening of the 23 day of May 1890 by bullets fired from a gun or guns which caused wounds. One shot under the left eye which passed through his head, also one on the left side of his neck just above his collar bone which passed through his right shoulder blade, which wounds was given by unknown party or parties with the premeditated design of affecting the death of the said C E Stewart.

In witness whereof we the said jurors as well as the justice acting as coroner aforesaid have to this inquisition set our hands on the day and year and the place aforesaid.

Attest: J T Roughare
T W Deason
GAcook
J E Collins
C M Whitehurst

James L Whitehurst, justice of the peace and acting as coroner for the time being

6

The following is a transcription by Lamon Geddie on January 13, 1999, of an article in The Colfax Chronicle dated May 24, 1980 and entitled A Bloody Sequel to the Rapides Charivari . (Copy attached). Copy made from film housed in the Colfax Public Library, Colfax, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is that J. J. Hunt is a direct ancestor.

A Bloody Sequel to the Rapides Charivari

On Thursday morning, May 22d, about 10 o'clock the citizens of Colfax were startled to see two men walk up the river bank in at the foot of Main street, one of whom carried a double barreled shot gun, while the other was literally dripping and saturated with blood from fifteen wounds in his breast, arms and legs. They reported that about 7 o'clock while they were at work at White and Hatton's mill in Rapides parish about five miles from Colfax, Jas. Johnson and John Bolden suddenly made their appearance and opened fire on them without warning, killing J. J. Hunt outright, and putting no less than nine buckshot in the body of Geo. C. Stewart, who notwithstanding he was felled to the ground, arose and made his escape by flight in spite of two or three loads of buckshot sent after him by the assailing party. Thos. J. Gentry who is the half brother of the man killed, and a brother-in-law to the wounded man, made his escape without a scratch, although he says he had no warning until the guns fired, and is convinced they fully intended to kill him. In company with the wounded man, Gentiy made his way on foot to Colfax, where Stewart is now under the treatment of Drs. Goode and Jones who are as yet unable to pronounce upon the nature of his wounds, although the patient seems to be in a fair way to survive his many hurts.

This affair is a sequel to the killing of young J. B. Johnson, and the wounding of two others, which occurred at Hemp Hill some seventeen miles west of Alexandria on the night of April 26th, when a charivari party was fired on from the house of Thos. J. Gentry. On the preliminary trial the Gentry party were admitted to bail in the sum of $300 each. As some threats of violence were made against them, Gentry and his relatives left Hemp Hill and came to White and Hatton' s mill near Lena Station, where they have been working for two or three weeks past, until the murderous assault made on them on Thursday morning.

The body of Mr. J. J. Hunt was brought to Colfax on Friday and buried here. Mr. Hunt will be recollected by many of our citizens as a pleasant young man of correct deportment who clerked in the neighborhood of Fairmount several years ago. He was in no way connected with the killing of Johnson's boy at the charivari, but

7

The following is a transcription by Lamon Geddie on January 13, 1999, of an article in The Colfax Chronicle dated May 24, 1980 and entitled "A Bloody Sequel to the Rapides Charivari." (Copy attached). Copy made from film housed in the Colfax Public Library, Colfax, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is that J. J. Hunt is a direct ancestor.

A Bloody Sequel to the Rapides Charivari

On Thursday morning, May 22d, about 10 o'clock the citizens of Colfax were startled to see two men walk up the river bank in at the foot of Main street, one of whom carried a double barreled shot gun, while the other was literally dripping and saturated with blood from fifteen wounds in his breast, arms and legs. They reported that about 7 o'clock while they were at work at White and Hatton's mill in Rapides parish about five miles from Colfax, Jas. Johnson and John Bolden suddenly made their appearance and opened fire on them without warning, killing J. J. Hunt outright, and putting no less than nine buckshot in the body of Geo. C. Stewart, who notwithstanding he was felled to the ground, arose and made his escape by flight in spite of two or three loads of buckshot sent after him by the assailing party. Thos. J. Gentry who is the half brother of the man killed, and a brother-in-law to the wounded man, made his escape without a scratch, although he says he had no warning until the guns fifed, and is convinced they frilly intended to kill him. In company with the wounded man, Gentry made his way on foot to Colfax, where Stewart is now under the treatment of Drs. Goode and Jones who are as yet unable to pronounce upon the nature of his wounds, although the patient seems to be in a fair way to survive his many hurts.

This affair is a sequel to the killing of young J. B. Johnson, and the wounding of two others, which occurred at Hemp Hill some seventeen miles west of Alexandria on the night of April 26th, when a charivari party was fifed on from the house of Thos. J. Gentry. On the preliminary trial the Gentry party were admitted to bail in the sum of $300 each. As some threats of violence were made against them, Gentry and his relatives left Hemp Hill and came to White and Hatton' s mill near Lena Station, where they have been working for two or three weeks past, until the murderous assault made on them on Thursday morning.

The body of Mr. J. J. Hunt was brought to Colfax on Friday and buried here. Mr. Hunt will be recollected by many of our citizens as a pleasant young man of correct deportment who clerked in the neighborhood of Fairmount several years ago. He was m not way connected with the killing of Johnson's boy at the charivari, but seems to have been shot down in cold blood simply because he was a relative and extended aid and counsel to the persons concerned in the first trouble.

Gentry says he has another brother living near Hemp Hill that he fears Johnson and Bolden may have killed before they came after himself and other brothers. The mill hands who witnessed the bloody work of the two men, said they gloated and boasted over their dead and swore they would kill the whole family if they remained on top of the ground. Each had a shot gun and a Winchester rifle, also side arms. They left the mill without molestation. The attacked party were unarmed.

A further article from the Colfax Chronicle - date unknown

The man, Geo. C. Stewart, who was shot at White & Hatton's mill in Rapides parish on the 22d, is getting well rapidly. After killing J. J. Hunt and wounding Stewart at the mill, Johnson and Bolden made their way to the home of Claude Stewart, George's father, and killed him that same day. Johnson and Bolden are still at large, although Sheriff Stafford and several Rapides deputies are after them.

9

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 13, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Louisiana Democrat Talk dated May 28, 1890 (copy attached). The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library, Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is that James Jefferson Hunt is a direct ancestor.

A FAMILY FEUD

JEFF HUNT KILLED NEAR LENA AND C. C. STEWART AT HEMPHILL. CLAUDE STEWART WOUNDED.

Since our last issue, two killings have occurred in this Parish, viz: - Jeff Hunt, near Lena, and C. C. Stewart, at Hemphill.

News of the Hunt killing was received here on the 22d by steamer Garland, a note unsigned being sent to Sheriff Stafford, as follows:

"At White & Haften' s mill Jeff Hunt was killed and one Stewart badly wounded. Jim Johnson, John Estes, and John Bolden are supposed to have done the killing" White & Haften' s mill is almost three miles from Lena, on the Texas & Pacific Railroad, in this parish. The killing occurred about six o'clock in the morning. The Jim Johnson mentioned is the father of the young Johnson who was killed in the charivari party at Hemphill, in this parish, on April 26, full particulars of which were published in this paper. Stewart who is reported wounded, is the party who was recently brought here and jailed and subsequently bailed, charged with the killing of young Johnson at Hemphill.

Sheriff Stafford went to arrest these parties, and returned the day afterwards. He has deputies on the lookout for the men. He brought the news of the second killing, viz: at Hemphill, a few hours after the Lena tragedy, when old man C. C. Stewart was killed by John Bolden.

From the facts learned both killings were premeditated. Johnson and Bolden had shot guns and rifles. Old man Johnson when he went to White & Hatten's mill carried his little boy's hat, and said that it had a bullet hole through it and a portion of his brains were on the inside. He is also reported as saying that he would make it warm for all who had a hand in the killing of his boy.

When last heard from Claude Stewart who was wounded at the mill, was still alive at Colfax. Quite an excitement is raging in the neighborhood where the killings occurred.

The remains of Hunt were taken to Colfax and buried.

The attacked party in both instances cited above were unarmed.

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 13, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk dated Saturday, May 31, 1890 (copy attached). The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library, Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance lies in the connection with the death of James Jefferson Hunt.

BLOOD FOR BLOOD

In our issue of May 3rd, we published an account of the killing of Jim Berry Johnson, the 14 year old son of James Johnson. This killing took place on Hemp Hill creek, this parish, on the night of April 25th. The deceased was one of a party who went to charivari Claude Stewart, who married a widow on or about the 10th of April.

The charivariing party were fired into from Stewart's house, which resulted in killing young Johnson, and wounding F. M. Mitcham and Jim Ritchie.

Claude Stewart and Thos. Gentry were arrested and charged with the killing of Johnson, and were brought in to town and placed in jail on Sunday, the 27th of April.

11

On Monday, May 5th, the accused were given a preliminary examination before Judge Blackman and were allowed appearance bonds in the sum of $300 each. Messrs. J. 1. Hunt and C. 0. Gentry were accused of being accessories in the killing and were also placed under appearance bonds of $300 each. All the accused furnished bond. In mentioning the fact that these men had been released on bond, Town Talk said there would be more trouble, and our prediction proved true.

The parties named above accused of killing and being accessories to the killing of young Johnson, fearing trouble, left their home and went to work at White & Hatton' s saw mill, some 3 miles from Lena Station and about 20 miles from their home. Jim Johnson, the father of the boy killed, swore vengeance against them all, and in company with John Bolon, went to the mill for the purpose of killing them. The best account we have yet seen of the affair, appeared in the Colfax Chronicle of the 24th inst., as follows:

"On Thursday morning, May 22nd about 10 o'clock the citizens of Colfax were startled to see tow men walk up the river bank at the foot of Main Street, one of whom carried a double barreled shot gun, while the other was literally dripping and saturated with blood from fifteen wounds in his breast, arms and legs. They reported that about 7 o'clock while they were at work at White and Hatton's mill in Rapides parish about five miles from Colfax, Jas. Johnson and John Bolon suddenly made their appearance and opened fire on them without warning, killing J. J. Hunt outright and putting no less than nine buckshot in the body of Geo. C. Stewart who, notwithstanding he was felled to the ground, arose and made his escape by flight in spite of two or three loads of buckshot sent after him by the assailing party. Thos. J. Gentiy, who is the half brother of the man killed, and a brother-in-law to the wounded man, made his escape without a scratch, although he says he had no warning until the guns fired, and is convinced they fully intended to kill him. In company with he wounded man, Gentry made his way on foot to Colfax, where Stewart is now under the treatment of Drs. Good and Jones, who are as yet unable to pronounce upon the nature of his wounds, although the patient seems to be in a fair way to survive his many hurts.

This affair is a sequel to the killing of young J. B. Johnson, and the wounding or two others, which occurred at Hemp Hill some seventeen miles west of Alexandria on the night of April 26th, when a charivari party was fired on from the house of Thos. J. Gentry. On the preliminary trial the Gentry party were admitted to bail in the sum of $300 each. As some threats of violence were made against them, Gentry and his relatives left Hemp Hill and came to White and Hatton' s mill near Lena Station, where they have been working for two or three weeks past, until the murderous assault made on them on Thursday morning.

The body of Mr. J. J. Hunt was brought to Colfax on Friday and buried here. Mr. Hunt will be recollected by many of our citizens as a pleasant young man of correct deportment who clerked in the neighborhood of Fairmount several years ago. He was in not way connected with the killing of Johnson's bot at the charivari, but seents to have been shot down in cold blood simply because he was a relative and extended aid and counsel to the persons concerned in the first trouble.

Gentry says he has another brother living near Hemp Hill that he fears Johnson and Bolden may have killed before they came after himself and other brothers. The mill hands who witnessed the bloody work of the two men, said they gloated and boasted over their dead and swore they would kill the whole family if they remained on top of the ground. Each had a shot gun and a Winchester rifle, also side arms. They left the mill without molestation. The attacked party were unarmed.

Sheriff Stafford received word of the killing on Thursday, the 22nd, by the steamer Garland, and left on the west bound T. & P. Train on the same evening going to the Hemp Hill neighborhood where Johnson and Bolan reside. What was the Sheriff's surprise to learn that not satisfied with the killing done at White & Hatton' s mill, John Bolan had gone back to the neighborhood of Hemp Hill, on Thursday, the 22nd, and about 3 o'clock p.m. had called out C. C. Stewart, at his saw mill, and shot him to death with a Winchester rifle. C. C. Stewart was the father of Claude Stewart, wounded by John Bolan and Jim Johnson at White & Hatton's mill that same morning.

The Sheriff tried to find out something about Bolan and Johnson, and which direction they had gone, but every man, woman and child asked were as dumb as an oyster, some from fear, others because of friendship. Johnson's wife told the Sheriff that as soon as her husband had killed Gentry he would surrender to the authorities.

It is said that Jim Johnson wears next to his heart the bloody hat his son wore at the time he was killed at the charivari .

In our last issue we stated that John Estes was accused of taking part in the killing of Hunt. The report received on the Garland so stated, but it was an error. John Estes had nothing to do with it.

13

Sheriff Stafford has sent out throughout the county posters offering a reward of $200 or $100 each for the arrest of either Johnson or Bolan. The posters read as follows:

I will pay a reward of $100 for the arrest of John W Bolan, about 30 years of age, 6 feet in height, iveight and 190 lbs.; light hair and small, light mustache; light blue eyes; full round face; florid complexion. One upper front tooth missing. Wanted for the murder of C. C. Stewart.

I will also pay $100 for the arrest of James Johnson - 37 years of age, looks older, about 5 feet, 10 inches in height; weighs about 100 lbs, light mustache and chin beard, sprinkled with gray; light eyes; complexion sallow. Wanted for the murder off J. Hunt.

D. T. Stafford

Sheriff of Rapides Parish, La

John Bolan has only been living in this parish a few years. He has the reputation of being a bad man and his latest murder of a defenseless old man, like Mr. Stewart, goes to prove the fact beyond dispute. Such men should be hung up tot he first tree. His case is entirely different from that of Johnson, because Johnson's son was killed almost for nothing, and every parent must know how he feels, but Bolan seems to be killing people just to keep his hand in.

T. 1. and C. C. Gentry came to Alexandria on last Thursday evening and are now at the jail here. They will remain there for safety, as their lives have been threatened by James Johnson. As Johnson how has no chance of killing the Gentry boys, it would be wise for him to come in and surrender to the authorities.

Another article in the same paper

NOT THE MAN

Sheriff D. T. Stafford received a telegram from Bunkie on Wednesday saying that Jim Johnson, wanted for the murder of J. J. Hunt, had been arrested and locked up there. The Sheriff left for Bunkie Wednesday morning, but instead of Johnson being arrested it was a piano tuner, who answered Johnson's description pretty well.

Transfers of property recorded by the Clerk of the District Court listed in the same paper

J. J. Hunt, to 0. R. Deason. Forty acres of land - price $50 . J. J. Hunt, to C. E. Stewart. Forty acres of land - price $40.

15

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 13, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk, dated June 8, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is that Jeff (James Jefferson) Hunt is a direct ancestor.

Bolan and Johnson Arrested

Last Monday morning our citizens were greatly surprised when they learned that James Johnson and John Bolan had been arrested. They were brought here on Saturday night the 22nd last, at 10 o'clock, and lodged in jail, but very few people knew it until next morning.

The arrest of Bolan was made on Friday evening, June 20th, by Mr. B. H. Lyons, the merchant at Hineston,, who was deputized for that purpose by Sheriff D. T. Stafford. As near as we can learn the arrest was made as follows: Bolan was sick and went to Hineston to get some medicine. Mr. Lyons heard that Bolan was in Dr. Webster Smith's office, so he took his shot gun, slipped in the office from the rear, and before Bolan saw him Mr. Lyons had his shot gun leveled at his face. Lyons told Bolan to take the pistol from his belt and lay it aside and to throw his hands up and do it quick. Bolan did as he was told in a rapid manner. Bolan had his Winchester rifle, but did not have time to reach it.

On Saturday morning Mr. Lyons accompanied by Messrs. G. Lucas and F. T. Marler, went to the house of James Johnson several miles from Hineston, and arrested him. Johnson could have been arrested before he was, but the Sheriff did not want him until Bolan had been arrested, as it was feared that Bolan would leave the country if Johnson was arrested first.

Bolan has cut on his rifle, "May 23, "90" the day that he supposed he killed old man Stewart. He also put three notches on the rifle, which he says means blood for every notch. We learn that Bolan says that it cannot be proved that he killed old man Stewart. If the Town Talk is not badly mistaken, it will be proven that not only did he kill old man Stewart, but helped to kill Jeff Hunt and wound Claude Stewart.

Mr. Lyons, for the arrests made, will receive $710 - $200 from Sheriff Stafford, $260 given by private citizens and $250 offered by the State for the arrest and conviction of Bolan.

16

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 15, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk, dated November 1, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is in connection with murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

The Jail

Since our last report the following changes have taken place at the jail.

INCARCERATED: Oct 23 - Chas Honn, Jno. Riles, Alfred Crook, James Caldwell, Chris. Claude, Granville Winchester. On the 26th - James Malone, Andy Malone.

On the 28th - Phil. Houston, Fred Jenkins, Wyatt Cooper, Edward Williams, A.

Ducote. On the 29th - Taylor Mann, Claude Stewart, Tom Genty. On the 30th - E.

E. Odom.

Turned out on 29 - Edward Williams, James Caldwell, Phil. Houston. On the 27th -James Malone, Andy Malone. On the 30th - Chris. Claude.

. Same paper, in another article...

District Court

Wednesday, Oct. 29th.

State vs. 1. R. Boland, murder. Case set for Thursday, Nov. 6th.

State vs. James Johnson and 1. R. Boland, Murder. Case set for Friday, Nov. 7th.

State vs. Thos. Gentry and Claude Stewart, manslaughter. Mr. E. 0. Hunter was appointed by the Court to defend accused. Case set for Wednesday, Nov. 5.

17

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 15, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk , dated November 8, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is in connection with murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

District Court

Thursday, Nov. 6th.

State vs. James Johnson and J. R. Boland, murder. Motion for severance filed by defendant, Johnson.

State vs. Thos. Gentry and Claude Stewart, manslaughter. Tried by jury and found not guilty. Accused released from custody.

18

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 15, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk, dated November 15, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is in connection with murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

District Court

Wednesday, Nov. 12th.

District Court met this day in pursuant to adjournment, His Honor, Judge Blackman, presiding.

State vs. Johnson & Boland, murder. Supplemental motion for severance filed by defendant, Johnson.

State vs. James Johnson and J. R. Boland, murder. Motion for severance by defendant, Johnson, taken up, argued and summifted. Motion sustained and severance ordered, both accused being present in open court. Case having been assigned for to-day was called for trial as to defendant, Johnson. The jury was drawn, and the evidence was finished, but night have arrived before the case was concluded, the court adjourned till Thursday at 9:30 a.m. and the jury were lock up for the night.

Thursday, Nov. 13,

The District Court met pursuant to adjournment, His Honor, Judge Blackman, presiding.

State vs. James Johnson, murder. This case was resumed, and after hearing the argument of counsel and charge of the Judge, the jury retired.

State vs. J. R. Boland, murder. This case was taken up and a great deal of trouble was had in finding a jury. Night arrived and only six jurymen had been sworn in, when court adjourned, and the six jurors were locked up for the night.

The jury in the case of the State vs. James Johnson, reported that they could not agree. They were ordered back to the jury room to remain in the custody of the Sheriff for the night.

Friday, Nov. 14th,

District Court met this day pursuant to adjournment, His Honor, Judge Blackman presiding.

State vs. James Johnson, murder. They jury came into court and rendered a verdict of guilty without capital punishment.

State vs. J. R. Bolan, murder. The jury in this case having been secured, the accused got up and plead guilty, and asked that the jury bring in a verdict of guilty without capital punishment. He stated that numerous rumors had reached him that the parties he had killed were going to kill him, and that he thought the only way to save his own life was to kill them. After the accused had made his statement the jury brought in a verdict of guilty without capital punishment.

Johnson and Bolan will be sentenced to the State penitentiary for life.

20

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 15, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk, dated November 22, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is in connection with murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

Bolan Attempts to Escape

John R. Bolan who was convicted of murder one day last week attempted to escape from the parish prison last Monday morning before daylight. Sheriff Stafford was sleeping in the jail cottage and was awakened by the sound of someone sawing. He got up as easily as possible and slipped around where the noise came from, and the sawing ceased. After daylight the Sheriff asked the prisoners who had done the sawing, and Bolan acknowledged that he was the man and barrelled over four others(?) attempting to flee. Afterward two more saws were found in his bed and another tool in the wall(?). Bolan had succeeded in cutting nearly through one of the iron bars in the window on the river side of the jail in what is known as the iron cell on the second floor. He would not tell who had given him the tools. The Sheriff will keep him in irons until he takes him to Baton Rouge.

21

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 15, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk, dated November 22, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is in connection with murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

District Court

Tuesday, Nov. 18th.

The District Court met this day in pursuant to adjournment, His Honor, Judge Blackman~ presiding.

State vs. John R. Boland, murder. Sentenced for life to the penitentiary.

State vs. John R. Boland and Jas Johnson, murder. Both sentenced to the penitentiary for life.

From another article in the same paper...

James Johnson, a white man, was sentenced to the penitentiary for life, for the murder of Jeff Hunt, white, near Lena, on the 22nd of May, 1890. Johnson leaves a wife and family residing in this parish.

22

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 15, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk, dated November 22, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is in connection with murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

Court Notes

Taken to the Penitentiary...

Sheriff D. T. Stafford, with Deputies D. H. Willis, James H. Randell and I. E. Thomas to assist him, left on last Wednesday over the Texas & Pacific road to carry the following prisoners, twelve in number to the State penitentiary:

John R. Boland, a white man, was sentenced for life on two convictions for murder. He killed C. C. Stewart, a white man, on Hemp Hill, this parish, on the 22nd of last May. He also helped to kill Jeff Hunt, a white man, on same day, near Lena, this parish. Boland was born in Wilson county, Texas, in 1865 and has resided in Avoyelles, Natchitoches, and Vernon parishes, in this State. He leave a wife, who resides in this parish.

James Johnson, a white man, was sentenced to the penitentiary for life, for the murder of Jeff Hunt, white, near Lena, on the 22nd of May, 1890. Johnson leaves a wife and family residing in this parish.

Sheriff Stafford and his deputies returned to Alexandria on Thursday evening. They had no trouble in getting the prisoners to Baton Rouge. The Sheriff informed Town Talk that all of the prisoners that he took down were sent out this week to work on levees and other jobs outside of the penitentiary walls. We don't think the convict levees will hold Boland many months.

23

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 15, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk, dated November 22, 1890. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is in connection with murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

Editorial

Before the Law

The District Court, which has been in session at Alexandria for the past five weeks, will adjourn early next week. It has been a long session and one of the most expensive held in this parish for years. The verdicts rendered by petit juries at this term have been a great improvement over the past, and many accused who were guilty were decided to be guilty by the juries who decided their cases.

We believe it has been a quarter of a century since a white man was found guilty of murder by a jury in Rapides parish, and when Boland and Johnson were found guilty it was a surprise to Town Talk as well as many of our law-abiding citizens. We hope that the laws will hereafter be carefully enforced: that petit jurors will bring in verdicts according to the oath that they take.

All citizens should be interested in having the laws strictly enforced, not only for their own personal safety, but for the reason that in any country where life and property are not safe, prosperity can not remain; instead lands will become valueless and unsalable; capital will seek other fields of investment; labor will look elsewhere for employment.

A very larger majority of the citizens of Rapides parish are law-abiding; and it seems to be the general opinion that "fixing juries," which is said to have been often done in the past, must cease. When the mufterings of men who love to uphold the law are heard in the land it means much, and it is believed that this feeling will continue until every man, high or low, rich or poor, a native or stranger, who commits crime in Rapides parish will be punished according to the laws of Louisiana.

24

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 15, 1999, of a copy of an article published in the Alexandria Weekly Town Talk, dated June 20, 1891. The copy was made from film of the original paper housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is in connection with murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

James Johnson Dead

Marion Perkins, convicted of resisting an officer at the October 1890 term of the District Court, has written to a friend in this parish that James Johnson, who was convicted of murder on November 11, 1890, died a few days ago. James Johnson and J. R. Bolon were convicted of murdering Mr. Hunt and Mr. Stewart in this parish, and were both sentenced to the penitentiary for life. We learn that Marion Perkins, who resided in Calca___ ward, this parish, is at work in the tailoring department of the penitentiary, and can make four pair of pants per day. Bolan is at work outside of the penitentiary walls.

25

The following is a transcription made by Lamon Geddie on January 18, 1999, of a copy of two marriage licenses. The copy was made from film of the original documents housed in the Alexandria Public Library in Alexandria, Louisiana. Genealogical significance is the first is the marriage of J W Warren to Elizabeth Gentry and the second is the marriage of James C Stewart to Elizabeth Warren, which marriage started the charivari that led to the murder of James Jefferson Hunt who is a direct ancestor.

STATE OF LOUISIANA, 102

Parish of Rapides.

Know all Men by these Presents, That weIW...WARREN as principal, andLC HLLNI as security are held and firmly bound unto the Governor of the State of Louisiana, in the sum of TWO HUNDRED Dollars, for the payment of which we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, by these presents.

Dated at Alexandria, the 4 day of JULY A. D., 1881.

WHEREAS, a License has been this day issued by the Clerk of the District Court, in and for the Parish of Rapides, to unite in the BOND OF MATRIMONY, the above bound Mr. J W WARREN and Mis. C E GENTRY .

Now, therefore, the condition of the above obligation is such, that if there should exist no lawful impediment to this alliance, then the said obligation to be null and void, else to remain in full force and virture.

Signed in the present of

Q..WAflS(signature) J W WARREN (signature)
JOHN HUNT (signature)

26

1'

STATE OF LOUISIANA, 211

Parish of Rapides.

Know all Men by these Presents, That we JAMES C STEWART as principal, and ________________________ as security are held and firmly bound unto the Governor of the State of Louisiana, in the sum of 150.00 Dollars, for the payment of which we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, by these presents.

Dated at Alexandria, the 14 day of APRIL A. D., 18 90 .

WHEREAS, a License has been this day issued by the Clerk of the District Court, in and for the Parish of Rapides, to unite in the BOND OF MATRIMONY, the above bound Mr. JAMES C STEWART and Mrs. ELIZABETH L WARREN .

Now, therefore, the condition of the above obligation is such, that if there should exist no lawful impediment to this alliance, then the said obligation to be null and void, else to remain in full force and virture.

Signed in the present of

C 0 WAITS (signature) JAMES C STEWART (signature)
J H WALKER (signature)